Fresh start for new Flames

 

 

Freddy Modin has played in 895 National Hockey League contests.

But that doesn’t mean the big Swedish left winger didn’t have a few butterflies before suiting up for game No. 1 with the Calgary Flames.

"There’s always some nerves in you," admitted Modin, who drew into the lineup Friday night against Columbus. "You get thrown into a new team and everything goes really fast.

"That first game is always fun to play and there’s always a little nerves in there too."

Last week, Modin was snapped up from the Atlanta Thrashers in exchange for a seventh round pick in the 2011 draft. The connection was in Flames acting general manager Jay Feaster, who was the general manager of the Tampa Bay Lightning while Modin was there.

He, and Brett Carson, who was with the Carolina Hurricanes, were the only new faces requiring new stalls in the Calgary Flames dressing room following the trade deadline.

After spending a few days with the team, both made their debut in Friday’s 4-3 overtime win.

"I’m very excited coming here," Modin said. "Seeing where this team is in the standings and the fighting and the battling that is going to go on throughout the rest of the year here.

"It really is exciting and it’s a lot of fun to get a chance to be part of it."

In the past three seasons, Modin has skated with four different teams in only 118 games. Most recently with the Thrashers this season, he had seven goals, 10 points, and was a minus-11. When he departed, Atlanta was just outside the Eastern Conference’s top-eight.

The Flames playoff status, on the other hand, changes nightly. After Friday, Calgary sat in fifth behind Chicago with 77 points.

However Modin said that getting the inital call about the trade — no matter what the situation — is never easy.

"I don’t know if shock is the right word," Modin said. "But it gets to you a little bit when you get that call. In life, it’s like anything else. But it goes really quick. You get the call from the team you are going to and start planning the trip and start packing your bags.

"The next day, you meet a bunch of new teammates."

For Carson, the 25-year-old defenceman was sweating on a stationary bike at the RBC Center in Raleigh, N.C., when he saw his name scroll accross the screen on T.V.; a waiver pickup who was now a Calgary Flame.

"I hadn’t even got the call yet," said the former captain of the Calgary Hitmen. "It came up right at noon. Kind of caught me by surprise.

"I was riding next to Ron Francis (Hurricanes associate head coach/director of player personnel), right when it popped up. Then I went in and talked to the coaches. I said my goodbyes, packed up, and flew out.

"Not much you can do about it."

Since leaving the Hitmen in 2006, Carson has been floating around the Hurricanes organization with the American Hockey League and the East Coast Hockey League. From 2008 to early last week, he has starred in 72 games with Carolina.

But with the Flames, Carson’s slate is now clean.

"A fresh start," said the Regina native. "Another chance to prove I belong in the NHL with a new set of coaches, a new group of guys. That’s the most exciting part.

"This is just another opportunity for me."

 

 

  • Subversive

    Is this a copy and paste from the Herald? I honestly hope we see some original content from you, Kirsten, and not just fluff pieces like this. If I wanted this kind of silly drivel, I could go pick up the Herald or the Sun. I (and most of the other readers, I believe) come here for something a little different, something a little more honest. I’m sure I’ll get flamed for this, but I just don’t see any added value in this posting at all.

  • The difference between traditional reporting and blogging styles is pretty apparent.

    There’s a price for reporters with access to a team — you don’t always get to insert opinion about what’s going on, unless you’re a columnist.

    A lot of the time, the blogosphere features nothing more than fan boy opinion, which is only as valuable as the fan boy.

    Which is why the data driven journalism (with a bit of opinion mixed in) is my new favourite style of sports reporting. But then you have the tendency to believe that data is determinative, and disregard other factors. Hockey is not a closed system, after all.

    I’d like to see advanced stats and data driven journalism become mainstream, with a little bit of the personality driven journalism injected into that to tell a fuller story.

    I think having Kristen writing here gives hope that we’ll get better analysis, both here and in the papers.

  • Being someone who has embraced advanced stats and incorporated them into my writing here and at http://www.fan960.com as well as using them on the radio, I get really tired of this whole msm vs. blog stuff.

    So what if Kristen didn’t have Corsi numbers, PDO stats and Qualcomp numbers? Why does that all of a sudden make her stuff fluff?

    Do you not think she researched her stuff, worked hard at getting those quotes, and thought about the direction her story was going to go? Like wtf? Of course she did.

    Kristen just added something this site does NOT have, and that is sourced material with quotes and human interest angles. What’s so wrong with ADDING to our product?

    Kent and Robert are two of the best in the business when it comes to analyzing hockey the way smart people know how. The way they interpret and explain advanced stats is second to none, and I’ve learned so much from them. twolinepass adds humour and snark to our site, while I try and pull back the curtain with the gameday and postgame stuff, while still incorporating advanced stats. KO has come on board to give us a missing piece…a journalistic angle, and I for one really enjoyed her article.

  • You are seeing blogger/MSM distinctions dissolve, although not as quickly as you might hope.

    But I agree with Pat, the more angles the better. And maybe we’ll get some unique hybrids in the process too.

    I also enjoy KO’s articles, both here and in the Herald. And I think that her being here really adds something (and not fluff!) to the Nation.

  • Thanks for the feedback guys, from all sides. As noted, there’s value to be had from various angles of covering the team. We’re going to try to continue to fuse it into a cohesive whole here at FN. It’s going to take some practice and wrangling, but I think it’s possible.

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  • Hey guys,

    Thanks for the insight and I appreciate all the comments.

    I’m new to the blog … but not new to the business.

    Subversive, I assure you, I put time, effort, and thought into all of my FN articles …. and approach them with the same amount of professionalism as I do when I write for the Calgary Herald.

    When it comes to FN …. I would think readers would want as many Flames stories as available and as much information, analysis, and stats as possible. My intention is to offer a different view of the dressing room. Not fluff pieces.

    Rock on.