Post-Game: Here’s Johnny

Tonight’s Calgary Flames game was a bit sloppy and the team looked decent in fits and starts, but hardly a world-beater. They exchanged power-play goals in the first with the Buffalo Sabres. Neither team looked amazing.

Then the third period came and the Flames realized it was a tie game against the worst team in the league. Three goals later, the Flames skated away with a 4-1 victory and a much-needed two points in the standings.

Here’s how it broke down.

THE RUNDOWN

The first period was notable for a handful of power-plays, including two Buffalo power-plays triggered by offensive zone penalties taken by Joe Colborne. The Sabres didn’t generate a shot on goal at all in the first half of the period, but scored on their second shot of the game – 12 seconds into their man advantage. Yikes. The Flames answered back a bit later on their own power-play, with Johnny Gaudreau accepting a pass in the corner of the Sabres zone and then deciding, “Hey, I’m gonna go to the front of the net!” Sean Monahan was out front and maybe Jhonas Enroth expected a pass, but he seemed caught off-guard that this small person was trying to score. And he did, to tie the game at 1-1. Shots were 8-5 Calgary, shot attempts were 16-4 Calgary, but the Sabres won the face-off battle by a 13-9 margin.

The second period was low event. Very low event. There were 18 shots on goal between both teams. The Sabres out-shot the Flames. Calgary had a power-play that generated zero shots on goal, by virtue of a Sabre clearing the puck over the glass. Johnny Gaudreau was buzzing around but didn’t score again. Sean Monahan had a golden chance late in the period, but somehow, some way, missed a wide open net.

The Flames really got going in the third period. They out-shot the Sabres 15-3. They out-attempted them 28-4. They out-scored them 3-0. Joe Colborne led the team on a rush and put a puck at the net; it bounced off a defender’s ankle and landed at Josh Jooris, who put it past Enroth to make it 2-1. A few minutes hence, at the conclusion of a second Buffalo puck-over-glass penalty, Joe Colborne knocked a rebound past Enroth for a 3-1 lead. And finally, Johnny Gaudreau scored his second of the game and 15th of the year off a gorgeous pass from Jiri Hudler to make it 4-1 with two minutes and change remaining. The gas pedal remained floored throughout the third period and the Flames won decisively.

WHY THE FLAMES WON

They were better than the Sabres at even-strength, and were a lot better than the Sabres in the final period. They bore down on the visitors when the game was in the balance and, as a result, they got the win.

RED WARRIOR

All-Star Johnny Gaudreau had two goals, a plus-1 rating and led the team’s forwards in ice-time.

SCORING CHANCES

Screen Shot 2015-01-29 at 2.04.39 PM

Team Period Time Note Home Away State
Away 1 17:36 Flynn 1 8 21 29 33 86 1 6 12 17 24 65 5v5
Away 1 17:31 Flynn deflection 1 8 21 29 33 86 1 6 12 17 24 65 5v5
Home 1 16:49 Byron 1 5 6 18 25 32 1 19 26 41 55 63 5v5
Home 1 14:26 Byron 1 18 25 29 32 33 1 12 41 44 55 65 5v5
Home 1 13:10 Backlund 1 5 7 11 17 19 1 6 12 17 57 65 5v5
Home 1 11:09 Jones 1 4 6 11 17 19 1 19 21 41 55 80 5v5
Away 1 11:01 Hodgson 1 4 6 11 17 19 1 19 21 41 55 80 5v5
Away 1 9:28 Stewart goal 1 5 7 17 18 1 28 55 57 63 80 4v5
Home 1 8:06 Raymond 1 7 8 11 21 33 1 4 28 44 57 5v4
Home 1 7:41 Brodie 1 7 8 11 21 33 1 4 28 44 57 5v4
Home 1 6:21 Gaudreau goal 1 5 6 13 23 24 1 4 12 57 65 5v4
Away 1 5:39 Hodgson 1 4 6 11 17 19 1 19 21 41 55 80 5v5
Home 1 3:02 Hudler 1 4 6 13 23 24 1 4 36 37 44 57 5v5
Away 1 0:39 Stafford 1 4 6 17 86 1 4 21 26 41 65 4v5
Home 2 19:28 Hudler 1 13 23 24 29 33 1 4 12 17 57 65 5v5
Away 2 17:01 Stafford 1 5 7 18 25 32 1 6 19 21 24 80 5v5
Home 2 16:48 Byron 1 5 7 18 25 32 1 6 19 21 24 80 5v5
Home 2 16:26 Hudler 1 5 7 13 23 24 1 6 19 21 24 80 5v5
Home 2 15:28 Jones 1 11 17 19 29 33 1 12 17 41 55 65 5v5
Away 2 14:44 Ellis 1 18 25 29 32 33 1 4 36 37 44 57 5v5
Away 2 13:47 Hodgson 1 5 7 13 23 24 1 6 19 21 24 80 5v5
Home 2 13:31 Jones 1 5 7 11 17 19 1 26 28 41 55 63 5v5
Home 2 9:31 Jones 1 7 13 23 24 33 1 19 21 41 55 80 5v5
Away 2 9:22 Stewart 1 7 17 19 33 86 1 19 21 41 55 80 5v5
Home 2 8:45 Gaudreau 1 4 6 13 23 24 1 19 21 41 55 80 5v5
Home 2 8:35 Hudler 1 4 6 13 23 24 1 19 21 41 55 80 5v5
Home 2 4:40 Raymond 1 5 7 18 21 25 1 12 17 41 55 65 5v5
Away 2 4:28 Flynn 1 5 7 8 21 86 1 6 12 17 24 65 5v5
Away 2 3:43 Moulson 1 4 6 8 19 86 1 4 26 28 57 63 5v5
Away 2 2:58 Ellis 1 4 6 11 19 21 1 36 37 41 44 55 5v5
Home 2 2:23 Monahan 1 5 7 13 23 24 1 4 19 21 57 80 5v5
Away 2 2:05 80 1 5 7 13 23 24 1 6 19 21 24 80 5v5
Home 3 19:50 Hudler 1 13 23 24 29 33 1 4 12 17 57 65 5v5
Home 3 17:50 Monahan tip 1 5 6 13 23 24 1 4 36 37 57 5v4
Home 3 16:15 Backlund 1 4 6 8 11 21 1 6 12 24 63 65 5v5
Home 3 13:03 Jones tip 1 11 17 19 29 33 1 17 24 36 41 44 5v5
Home 3 10:56 Colborne 1 4 7 8 21 86 1 6 26 28 57 63 5v5
Home 3 10:55 Jooris goal 1 4 6 11 17 19 1 21 41 44 55 80 5v5
Home 3 7:23 Giordano 1 5 6 13 23 24 1 4 12 36 57 5v4
Home 3 5:55 Colborne goal 1 7 8 21 24 33 1 17 24 28 41 5v4
Home 3 2:33 Gaudreau goal 1 4 6 13 23 24 1 12 17 41 55 65 5v5
Home 3 1:37 Bollig 1 11 25 29 32 33 1 4 19 21 57 80 5v5
# Player EV PP SH
1 HILLER, JONAS   22 12   6 0   0 2
4 RUSSELL, KRIS 20:49 8 4 00:20 0 0 01:02 0 1
5 GIORDANO, MARK 17:30 7 4 05:34 3 0 01:06 0 1
6 WIDEMAN, DENNIS 19:51 8 4 05:14 3 0 00:53 0 1
7 BRODIE, TJ 18:57 8 5 02:30 3 0 01:18 0 1
8 COLBORNE, JOE 12:59 2 4 03:43 3 0 00:00 0 0
11 BACKLUND, MIKAEL 14:02 8 3 03:13 2 0 00:38 0 0
13 GAUDREAU, JOHNNY 15:57 9 2 04:49 3 0 00:00 0 0
17 BOUMA, LANCE 12:21 6 3 00:00 0 0 01:11 0 2
18 STAJAN, MATT 09:48 4 2 00:00 0 0 00:43 0 1
19 JONES, DAVID 15:34 6 5 00:00 0 0 00:00 0 0
21 RAYMOND, MASON 12:04 3 4 02:55 3 0 00:00 0 0
23 MONAHAN, SEAN 14:06 9 2 04:10 3 0 00:24 0 0
24 HUDLER, JIRI 14:48 9 2 04:49 4 0 00:00 0 0
25 BOLLIG, BRANDON 08:28 5 2 00:00 0 0 00:00 0 0
29 ENGELLAND, DERYK 10:54 6 3 00:00 0 0 00:05 0 0
32 BYRON, PAUL 08:30 4 2 00:00 0 0 00:38 0 0
33 DIAZ, RAPHAEL 11:47 7 4 02:08 3 0 00:02 0 0
86 JOORIS, JOSH 11:32 1 5 00:00 0 0 00:52 0 1
Period Totals EV PP 5v3 PP SH 5v3 SH
1 8 6 5 4 3 0 0 0 0 2 0 0
2 10 8 10 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3 10 0 7 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

ZONE ENTRIES

Screen Shot 2015-01-29 at 2.15.04 PM

Screen Shot 2015-01-29 at 2.15.11 PM

SUM IT UP

The Flames now sit 26-19-3 with 55 points in the Western playoff race. They’re back in action on Thursday night when they host the Minnesota Wild. Puck drop is at 7pm and the action is on Sportsnet West.

  • Bob's Hockey Stick

    A lovely win for the Flame. Gratz to Johnny G. for the two goal night. with johnny Hockey’s production this year really has become a Cammi who ?. And props to Jooris and Colburne. Good game excellent result.

  • everton fc

    I’m starting to think Gio’s more like 5″10″ than 6’0″.

    Guys like Bouma and Jooris are real winners. Ditto Russell. You need guys like this to push the team every evening, every shift. They are leaders.

    Now all we need is that 3/4 d-man! Or perhaps Wotherspoon and Diaz become a miraculous pairing!!

    • beloch

      I’m hoping it was also because Wotherspoon is up for a cup of coffee. If the spoon sticks, Diaz is the most likely guy to be sent to Adirondack.

      I really want to see Wotherspoon play on Thursday. One reason the Flames have surprised this season is because of a stacked farm and lots of competition for a spot amongst the forwards. The Flames’ system isn’t nearly as deep on the blueline, but not one AHL defenceman has suited up for a game so far this season. It’s about time the bottom four felt a little less secure.

  • Skuehler

    I feel like the all star game was great for Gio and Gaudreau. For Gio to go from Undrafted to all star is a nice accomplishment. And for Johnny, I think he can play looser now. All questions are settled. He belongs. Now he can focus on playing his game – wouldn’t be surprised to see his production continue to improve.

    I also think it’s awesome for the org. Other players in the league will take note of guys like Gio, Johnny, Jooris, BOUMA, Russell can come here, be given an opportunity and become real contributors and key peices of the team.

    If you can play hockey and work hard for the benefit of the team, you will get your shot. No matter your pedigree or size.

  • RexLibris

    The following article sums up why CORSI and PDO only gives a limited picture about the Flames…except it’s about the Oilers so thankfully we need to think of it the other way around:

    http://www.coppernblue.com/2015/1/26/7918781/why-the-oilers-pdo-will-not-regress-it-s-their-parzona-of-course

    May I suggest that Flamesnation use this new statistic going forward or explain why not? Ryan? Kent? I notice you hardly respond to requests for additional analysis or questions about your analysis. You guys do a fantastic job, but I think Flamesnation could be more on the cutting edge of analytics rather than letting our Edmonton cousins take the lead.

      • MonsterPod

        I totally agree with you “B” … a surprising article and well thought out. “Wowsers” … I would like to see the same ParZona stat for the Flames. Every goal we scored last night was from prime ParZona territory … hmmm.

        We all enjoyed the final outcome but leaving it so often till the 3rd makes for a degree of anxiousness!

        Really enjoyed Colborne’s race to the prime ParZona territory v Moulsen with Jooris netting the winner because of it! And everyone’s comments on JHockey are excellent … if the All-Star experience inspires JH, then this home stand could be yet another surprise for us!

        Finally, I thought the 4th line should get some props as well … they had amongst the best shifts in the 1st and 2nd periods and were unlucky not to score … or I should say they deserved to produce a goal.

        I just do not see TSpoon being worse than Engeland … every time 5+6 are on the ice, I look forward to the next change! Though I felt Diaz was OK last night … have a good day all!

    • RexLibris

      If you Flames fans weren’t so busy celebrating these whatchamacallits (wins?) then maybe you’d have more time to analytically autopsy your favourite team’s performance going back a decade.

      Winter in Alberta. Oilers out of the playoff race ten games into the season. “HEY! Let’s break out the new TI graphing calculators and see if we can outsmart our GM!”

      • Greg

        Very true. People tend to try and figure out what’s broken when things are going bad, not what’s working when everything is going well. Hence the prolific contributions to hockey analytics amongst the Oiler community. Haha.

        @ofcorsi thanks for sharing the link, it’s a good article, and helps explain why Corsi and PDO Analysis seem to be more “off” then they have been in the past. Seems teams learned the importance of corsi and suddenly corsi events went up, but you can’t just, for example, throw it at the net from the blue line before every line change, then say that’ll pump up my corsi numbers and wins will follow. Or block all point shots and our fenwick % will improve, and wins will follow.

        Now teams are learning it’s not just corsi events but where those events are occurring on the ice makes a big difference in success rates. I’ll be interested to see more results from that line of investigation. It seems to indicate why the Oilers PDO is so low, and I’ll be curious to see if explains why the flames are winning despite being a “poor possession” team according to simple corsi.

        Actually there’s a few things I’ll be curious to see if it sheds light on like:
        1) do goalie save percentages mostly correlate with how close in their team allows shots from?
        2) do some goalies just look really good because their teams are good at preventing shots from in close (hypothesis: Crawford)? And do some just look bad because their teams allow a lot of shots from high percentage areas (hypothesis: Scrivens)?
        3) do some goalies standout as actually really good (or really bad) when their save percentages are adjusted for shot locations?
        4) do some teams have better win percentages than corsi would predict because they are just better at either preventing shots from in close (ala Nashville and their super-duper defence) or generating a higher percentage of shots from in close (ala Anaheim and the getzlaf-perry effect)?

        • Johnny Goooooooaldreau

          You say “now teams are learning it’s not just corsi events, but where those events are occurring on the ice that makes a big difference in success rates.”

          This is the whole reason “hockey” people don’t agree with the stats geeks about the importance of corsi. Of course quality of shot is more important than quantity.

          And as far as PDO goes, if you are a “scorer” then you will have a higher PDO than someone with no scoring ability like Paul Byron, and what the heck does my goalies save % have to do with my shooting % anyway? Useless stat.
          Anyone with eyes can see that Joe Colborne is a better player than Paul Byron is.

        • Aussie Flame

          I have posted this on previous articles, but it seems valid again here.

          http://www.sportsnet.ca/hockey/nhl/in-the-nhl-save-percentage-is-a-team-stat/

          The author tracked the types of shots a goalie faced (clean, pass and shoot, tipped, rebound) and an average save % for each. Then by tracking the quantity of each shot against a team, could determine what an “average” goalie would save.
          In doing this it does seem that save % is greatly influenced by what shots a defence lets through, and why some teams always seem to have higher PDOs than others

    • beloch

      I agree with coppernblue that war-on-ice’s hextally’s are pretty sweet. In case you read that and were wondering how the Flames numbers stack up, here’s a quick comparison. (Note: All stats here are even strength)

      Offense:
      Here, %Success is successes/chances and %Total is the Chances from each position over total chances. The former gives us an idea of how much shots from each position are worth while the latter tells us how the Oilers and Flames are choosing to shoot the puck.

      Oilers
      ———-
      Position — Point — High Slot — Low Slot
      Chances — 1023 — 580 — 398
      Successes —– 13 —- 27 —- 32
      %Success — 1.27% — 4.66% — 8.04%
      %Total — 51.1% — 29.0% — 19.9%

      Total Chances: 2001

      Flames
      ———–
      Position — Point — High Slot — Low Slot
      Chances — 825 — 627 — 411
      Successes —– 13 —– 34 —– 37
      %Success — 1.58% — 5.42% — 8.04%
      %Total — 44.3% — 33.7% — 22.1%

      Total Chances: 1863

      This shows an interesting difference between the Flames and Oilers. The Flames have fewer chances overall, but have more chances from the low slot than the Oilers both proportionally and in absolute number. The story is the same from the high slot, only to even greater degree. Both of these areas offer a significantly better chance of success than shots from the point. So here we see one reason why the Flames are scoring more goals than the Oilers. The Flames shoot from more dangerous areas. The Flames also had a higher chance of success from both from the point and high slot, which might be due to the quality of defencemen taking those point shots or moving into the high slot to unload.

      Defense:
      Now, let’s look at the defensive picture. Here are the proportion of chances against the Oilers and Flames:

      Here, “Rate Rel.” is the relative chance rate compared to the league average and “Sh% Rel.” is the relative success compared to league average.

      Oilers
      ———-
      Position — Point — High Slot — Low Slot
      Rate Rel. — 0.993 — 1.06 — 0.986
      Sh% Rel. — 1.51 — 1.28 — 1.14

      Flames
      ———–
      Position — Point — High Slot — Low Slot
      Rate Rel. — 1.08 — 1.25 — 1.10
      Sh% Rel. — 1.06 — 0.857 — 0.821

      The relative shooting rates show that the Oilers are actually pretty close to league average across the board while the Flames allow more shots on average across the board, especially from the high slot. The relative success of Edmonton’s opponents is way above league average while the Flames is significantly below except from the point, which matters the least anyways. To me, the difference there is all goal-tending. The Flames have gotten great goal-tending while I suspect MacTavish is deliberately tanking his team by refusing to fix the hot mess he put in net.

      TL;DR version:
      The Flames appear to produce more goals than the Oilers because they shoot the puck from more dangerous areas. The Oilers defense is, to the surprise of everyone, not as bad as it seems. At evens, at least, the Oilers seem to allow fewer shots across the board than the Flames. The difference is all goal-tending.

      • Johnny Goooooooaldreau

        beloch,
        That Copper N Blue article was a killer, a great summation. Your further take into the Flames also very good. On the offensive side I would agree completely, the Flames take higher quality shots which is a large part of their success. On the defensive side the Flames are very anomalous (higher Corsi-against, but lower Success-Against) which you attribute totally to goaltending. On this I cannot agree. When I checked further I found our goaltending is just slightly above league average which does not support your contention. I also found we lead the league, by a significant margin, in Shots Blocked, which I think you’ll find is a much better explanation for their success, along with our improved goaltending versus last year.

      • Burnward

        “TL;DR version:
        The Flames appear to produce more goals than the Oilers because they shoot the puck from more dangerous areas. The Oilers defense is, to the surprise of everyone, not as bad as it seems. At evens, at least, the Oilers seem to allow fewer shots across the board than the Flames. The difference is all goal-tending.”

        Thanks for this analysis Beloch! It supports what the Flames fans have been saying all along – Quality of shots over Quantity is what matters most!

    • ChinookArchYYC

      Woah.. great article. I suddenly feel like Neo when he sees the Matrix for the first time.

      I always knew there was something missing from the PDO and Corsi stats.

  • MonsterPod

    I was nervous about this one, and for two periods it looked like the Flames were too. I had an early feeling we were gonna lose in OT.

    Johnny had a slow start to the season and Forsberg in Nash had a crazy hot start — point per game pace. Wondering if they’ll switch down the stretch and if Johnny can take the rookie scoring lead. Go Johnny go go go…

    Nice to see Colborne first star after taking two offensive zone penalties in the first period. Hoping to see Wotherspoon on Thursday. And I see no reason not to bench Raymond for Baertschi against Minny.

    GFG

  • Burnward

    I think your numbers are great, can’t get behind the analysis though.

    The Oilers lack heart and structure to their defensive game. At least they did under Eakins. Slowly starting to change. This, more than anything is why they allow so many goals. Fasth and Scrivens may not be world beaters, but I doubt they’d be as bad elsewhere.

    Teams also tend to stop shooting as much when they’re up by three.

    Aaaaaand, Calgary has gotten league average tending this year. It’s been streaky though.

    • beloch

      You are right about the Oilers tendency to get blown out frequently while the Flames are usually within a goal most games. Other teams turtling might make Edmonton’s blueline look better than it really is. The Flames blueline does allow significantly more shots than league average though. There’s no getting around that ugly truth. This is why I’m stoked about Wotherspoon being called up. Change is badly needed in the bottom four.

      Oh, and here’s another reality check you just made me give myself. The Flames’ sv% this season is 0.9068, which is below the league average of 0.9093. The Flames are actually (just barely) in the bottom third of the league in that stat. Hiller’s not the reason though. He’s at 0.912 right now, which is slightly below his career average of 0.916. Here’s hoping he progresses towards his mean down the stretch!

        • Nick24

          They have been all year (and all last year too). They’re still bad, mind you, but it’s like 47% as opposed to 44%.

          Also worth noting that the Flames’ numbers improve slightly if you limit the sample to score close.

      • Burnward

        Exchanges like this are why I love this place so.

        Just going to throw one more stat at you though. Ha!

        Calgary is actually eighth in the league in shots against, allowing 27.9/per game.

      • MonsterPod

        “Oh, and here’s another reality check you just made me give myself. The Flames’ sv% this season is 0.9068, which is below the league average of 0.9093. The Flames are actually (just barely) in the bottom third of the league in that stat. Hiller’s not the reason though. He’s at 0.912 right now, which is slightly below his career average of 0.916. ”

        By my calculations the Flames Save % is: 0.913

        GOALIE SAVeS SHOTS PERCENT
        ———————————–
        Hiller 727 797 0.912
        Ramo 369 406 0.904
        Ortio 131 140 0.935
        ———————————–
        Total 1227 1343 0.913

  • Nick24

    My favorite part was during the pregame Sports Net showed a picture of Gaudreau with the question: “Hitting a Wall?” Which was asked in regard to him getting rundown in a full 82 game campaign.

    Personally I’ve found this concern to be an odd one. I mean he’s 21 for god’s sake! What do you think he was doing in the off season? This kid worked so that he could be prepared and on top of that, it’s not like he’s an old man. If he’s going to survive a full season, it’ll be when he’s younger, not older!

    Also, why are they still doubting him? First he’s too small, now he’s getting too tired. Why can’t people just accept that he’s going to have ups and downs throughout the season! Its not realistic to expect him to be playing amazingly all season long, because player production is going to fluctuate over a season.

    What else does he have to do?

    • prendrefeu

      What else does he have to do?

      Score the winning goal in game 5 (yes, 5) of the Stan Lee Bowl Champion Ship, and then circle the rink carrying said trophy.

      Until then, the pundits will never be satisfied.

  • Aussie Flame

    Thanks for your comments Beloch re: Flames’ comparative ParZona.

    A seemingly few extra goals ‘down low and in the slot’ plus that clear win in goaltending makes a huge difference. I counted 11 extra goals and piles of extra confidence for our squad!

    Wild will be desperate on Thursday … it might be difficult for Hartley to put in all 3 from Addy in the line-up as Bollig and Raymond were OK last night. TSpoon for Engeland?

    Cheers!

  • The Last Big Bear

    I have to congratulate the advanced stats geeks on this site: the advanced stats of this game actually matched the outcome of the game!!!!

    It took 48 games and playing the worst team in the league (in every category) but it happened!!

    As they say: “even a broken clock is right twice a day……….

    No really: Congratulations!!!

    WW

  • RedMan

    If Hartly wants to get my vote for coach of the year, he needs to start getting this team to play the third period three times in a game.

    Always enjoy a win, but it was a little too evenly matched in the first, though in the second they started to gain momentum. then by the third, they steamrolled Buffalo.

  • ChinookArchYYC

    Here’s a stat question that I’m amazed no one has caught yet, Ryan:

    If the Sabres only had 4 attempts in the first period, how did they have 5 shots?

    Shots were 8-5 Calgary, shot attempts were 16-4 Calgary

  • As those of you that follow me on twitter already know, this was a Double Victory for Flames fans. Flames are 2 pts closer to the playoffs, and the Sabres are -2 pts closer to keeping the Oilers out of last place.

    Of course, the Oilers responded by losing their own game last night. Would it be in poor taste to start cheering for the Oilers to win some?

  • Johnny Goooooooaldreau

    Actually there’s a few things I’ll be curious to see if it sheds light on like: 1) do goalie save percentages mostly correlate with how close in their team allows shots from? 2) do some goalies just look really good because their teams are good at preventing shots from in close (hypothesis: Crawford)? And do some just look bad because their teams allow a lot of shots from high percentage areas (hypothesis: Scrivens)? 3) do some goalies standout as actually really good (or really bad) when their save percentages are adjusted for shot locations? 4) do some teams have better win percentages than corsi would predict because they are just better at either preventing shots from in close (ala Nashville and their super-duper defence) or generating a higher percentage of shots from in close (ala Anaheim and the getzlaf-perry effect)?

    The above are very good questions Greg! Again, I suspect a small difference in eventual percentages makes a big difference.

  • Johnny Goooooooaldreau

    Ryan, it appears that the point of your article got blindsided by advanced stats discussion.

    I agree with you regarding go with your best on the first power play unit and maybe put a defensively responsible forward like Backlund on the point. Hartley seems to be of the viewpoint that if you spread the top talent on both units then it would be more difficult to defend against. Your analysis proves that wrong.

  • everton fc

    I think they should give Diaz and Wotherspoon a whirl. Wotherspoon and Engelland is redundant; two stay-at-home d-men, one neither fleet of foot or offencively-minded.

    Diaz will need a competent, strong, puck-moving stay-at-home type partner to be able to offer anything more than he already has….

  • MonsterPod

    I think we’re remiss here to pigeonhole Wotherspoon into a 5/6 role. Certainly he’s that for us now, but he could play top 4 someday.

    He was paired with Jones in Portland, led that league in +/- and put up some points. He played for Canada in the WJC.

    Seiloff on the farm has 2 points in 23 games. He’s a stay at home D.

    Wotherspoon has 2 15 17 in 39 games. Not bad.

    At 6’2″ and 210 he’s a solid prospect and might be a compliment to Russell next year if we cash in on Wideman at the deadline.